WE DON’T GO THERE: RACIAL RECONCILIATION AND THE GOSPEL

We don’t go there.” My mom told me this when I told her I was going to a local Southern Baptist church in my hometown for the first time. I knew what she meant. She meant that the church had a history of restricting black people from their services. She meant you would not fit in there. She meant people would look at you as if you didn’t belong there. Despite her warning, I said, “Well, I am going.”

Southern Baptists have a sinful past. Convictions about slavery resulted in the formation of the SBC. Our denominational leaders defended the right to own black people as property. We have a history of excluding African-Americans from our churches. Southern Baptists opposed and/or didn’t support the Civil Rights Movement.[1] 

There are still churches where African-Americans are not welcome. Churches continue to fire staff because of the church’s racism. Many churches are still reluctant to speak up for equality and injustice. In the past, we thought racial reconciliation was a social issue. We willingly gave the task to the secular world. Racial Reconciliation is a Christian issue, but more than that it is a Gospel issue.

The Gospel Speaks to Racial Reconciliation

In Antioch, Peter began eating and fellowshipping with Gentiles. Then the Jews came to town and Peter changed. He began to withdraw from the Gentiles. He feared his circumcised brothers, which even caused Barnabas to act hypocritically.  They were afraid the Jews would think they were associating with Gentile sinners.

Paul was so outraged by Peter’s behavior that he rebuked Peter in front of everyone. Paul comments about their conduct saying their “conduct was not in step with the truth of the Gospel,” (Galatians 2:14). This comment implies the Gospel speaks to racial reconciliation and racism.

The truth of the Gospel is that Jesus has broken down the dividing wall of hostility (Ephesians 2:14) and now we are fellow citizens of the household of God (Ephesians 2:19). God has provided us with a message that brings together even those who have a history of hating one another. No philosophy or secular idea has the power of our Gospel. We have a message that reconciles. It reconciles people to God and people to one another.

Resolved

In 1996, Southern Baptist resolved “to pursue racial reconciliation in all our relationships, especially with our brothers and sisters in Christ.” [2] Racial Reconciliation begins with listening to brothers and sisters in Christ from various ethnicities.

Listen to learn.

One conversation is not the final solution, but one of many can help in discerning it. Are we resolved to do so? Church, we can’t change yesterday, but we can set the pace for tomorrow. We can’t allow the past and cultural differences to prevent the unity of God’s people.

When my mom said “We don’t go there” she wanted the past to prevent me from going to that church. After the warning, I attended that church. That day I had the opportunity to see an African-American deacon preach. I could have missed seeing someone who was once not allowed in the services preach there. We must remember the past but not let it prevent unity.

I know the SBC used to prevent my people from membership in their churches. I know they fought for the right to have slaves.

But I refuse to let that prevent the unity of the Body of Christ. I am resolved to pursue racial reconciliation. I urge you to join me in the pursuit of uniting God’s people through the power of the Gospel. This must be an intentional effort or it could be said about your church, ministry, or seminary that “We don’t go there.”

References

Resolution On Racial Reconciliation On The 150th Anniversary Of The Southern Baptist Convention Atlanta, Georgia – 1995

http://www.sbc.net/resolutions/899/resolution-on-racial-reconciliation-on-the-150th-anniversary-of-the-southern-baptist-convention

 

[2] Ibid

 

 

Originally Posted on Geaux Therefore

 

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To Stand or Kneel: 5 Thoughts to Consider About the NFL Protest

He should stand.” My wife told me this when Colin Kaepernick began sitting during the national anthem. We disagreed. The conversation revealed our cultural differences. Her people honored the country through patriotic songs and regalia. My people love the country but were skeptical of it. We didn’t celebrate freedom on the Fourth of July because our freedom came much later. I stopped pledging allegiance to the flag. I don’t agree with the introduction of the pledge at such a young age.

My wife and I explained our stances in hopes of understanding each other. I shared several thoughts with her, and I want to share them with you. I pray this is helpful in helping the church think through these issues. First, I acknowledge that many of the NFL players are kneeling in response to comments made by our president. Yet, Colin was not alone in his stances. So I am speaking of those who are kneeling because of the racial injustices in America.

The  Star-Spangled Banner Is a Diss Track

We don’t sing the entire Star Spangled Banner. The length is one reason the other reason is one of the following verses which is:

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
That the havoc of war and the battle’s confusion
A home and a Country should leave us no more?
Their blood has wash’d out their foul footstep’s pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

The mention of the slave and hirelings expresses Francis Scott Key’s bitterness. Key was bitter about the runaway slaves who enlisted in the British army and fought against him. The Star-Spangled Banner seems more like a diss track than an ode to our country.

They Love this Country

The NFL players who are protesting are not terrorist. They don’t hate this country or want to see it divided. They love it. Their love for this country sparked their kneeling because they desire it to do better. They are hopeful. They have family in this country and want them to grow up in a better America.

I love America more than any other country in this world, and, exactly for this reason, I insist on the right to criticize her perpetually.

James A. Baldwin

Hating this country would result in them allowing it to continue in its folly. But love motivates them to speak or kneel.

What Is A Better Option?

It is unfortunate that demonstrations are taking place in Birmingham, but it is even more unfortunate that the city’s white power structure left the Negro with no alternative”

Martin Luther King Jr.

These players hate seeing black people suffer. How should they respond to their people murdered in the streets and no one is convicted? How are they to respond when they look at the wealth gap in America? What should they say when they see the education gap? How should they respond when they oppose violence?  

The conversation about racial equality has been going on for years in our country. It is why Frederick Douglass asked the question “What to the slave is the fourth of July?”  It is why Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists at the Olympics. Racial inequality is the reason Muhammad Ali refused to be drafted. It is why Jackie Robinson spoke about black equality. What are their options for issues we have evaded for years?

Who Are They Harming?

These players are kneeling and locking arms during the national anthem. The First Amendment gives them to right to protest. Veterans fought for their right to do so. No property is being destroyed. No people are being threatened. No one is being hurt. Are they seeking to divide the country or are they asking it to do better? Who is being harmed? 

Has Our Response Been Cultural Or Christian?

Nationalism is not Christian. Ethnocentrism is not Christian. No flag or ethnicity is higher than the blood-stained banner of Jesus. Our primary citizenship is in heaven. Though we are to seek the wellbeing of our nation this not home. We are exiles and sojourners in this land. Our concern ought not to be if people stand or kneel for a country, but our concern should be are they standing on the promises of God and kneeling down to pray. We ought to be seeking the kingdom and Jesus’ righteousness.

Scripture does demand we take care of the orphans and those who are in poverty. It does command us to take care of the foreigners in our land. By doing so we are reflecting the character of God. He executes justice and gives food to the hungry (Psalm 146:7). He is the one who watches over the sojourner and holds the widows (Psalm 146:9). He cares for the fatherless ( Psalm 146:9).

The players are kneeling to give a voice to the often unheard. Whether you stand or kneel you ought to seek to do the same.

Open your mouth for the mute,
   for the rights of all who are destitute,
Open your mouth, judge righteously,
   defend the rights of the poor and needy.

Proverbs 31:8-9

 

 

What Are 5 Facts I Want My White Friends to Know?

Dear White Friends,

I have been a minority in many white settings for several years. I have been studying your culture. I have listened to your music and watched your movies. I have learned your terminology. Minorities have been studying your culture for years. I would argue we know more about you than you know about us.

Our country continues to have racial tension, and you often wonder how do I respond as a white person?  Or what should I be aware of? Let me offer you 5 things to be of aware in this post and five ways to respond in the next post. 

1) You Stereotype Black People

  You question our blackness, which demonstrates a narrow view of black culture.  You call us Oreos (black on the outside and white on the inside), which displays you have a stereotypical view of black people. How prideful is it that you tell black people what blackness is?

Black people come in all shapes, sizes, shades, and cultures. Kendrick Lamar and Darius Rucker have cultural differences but they are both black. Heed the words of Carlton Banks from the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air “Black is not something I am trying to be, black is what I am.”

2)  Your White Shame is Worthless

Please, stop apologizing for being white. God made you white. He placed you in your ethnic group for a reason. Brothers and Sisters, you are a part of an ethnic group and don’t forget that. You carry the heritage placed on you by history. You have privilege. You can deny all the evil your people have done, but history remains. You can’t escape history. Those who ignore history will repeat it. Don’t ignore it, learn from it. Friends stop fantasizing about being a minority and embrace who God has made you.

3) Your News Sources Are Homogeneous 

The words of Fox News and The Wall Street Journal are not gospel.  Bipartisan news sources are hard to find. So read various new sources to have an informed opinion. I remember researching the Philando Castile shooting on various news sites. I noticed several of them focused more on his history with the police and the others focused on who he was. Conservative news sources alone will hinder your understanding of racial issues. Try reading NBC Black or Huffington Post Black Voices. Diversify your News feed. 

4) Your Black and Brown Brothers Don’t Have All the Answers

We don’t know the answers to all the racial issues in America. We have to do research too. I want you to know you can do the same research and study like we do. Friends, I have gone to the same institutions you have. We have the same training. Don’t make me do all the work when we have the same resources available to us. I can give you a starting point to narrow it down then you can began to research. Don’t hire minorities in your church and expect them to have solutions for your racial issues. The pressure is overwhelming.

5) We Love Our Folks

In Romans 9:3 Paul says he would endure the wrath of God if his kinfolk could be saved. Paul loved his kinsmen. We love our people. We love to see them succeed and we will champion them, which doesn’t mean we agree with everything they do or say. We have endured so much as a people and we love to see progress. We hate to see them fall. We despise hearing of black celebrity scandals. We deplore hearing about the unjust death of one of our own. It doesn’t matter whether we know them or not. Their geographic location doesn’t matter. What matters is that they are one of ours.  We want to see fewer people of color in poverty and prison. Our desire is to see more scholars, doctors, and judges who represent us. Don’t worry we are not planning a societal takeover. We just want our people to flourish. This is why we say #BlackLivesMatter. We don’t consider other lives inferior. Please, stop saying All Lives Matter it is an insult to our intelligence and it is offensive.  But we want people to know black lives matter too. I am not advocating for the organization, but I am advocating for the statement. For more on that checkout Dr. Carl Ellis’s blog.

Stay Tuned for Part 2……

Photo by Brad Neathery on Unsplash

Food For Thought: How Tacos Remind Us of Jesus and the Church

All creation speaks of God even tacos. Animals tell us he is a creative Creator. The mountains tell us he is a strong Savior. Oceans remind us of how expansive our God is. What do tacos tell us about God? 

One fact you should know is that my personal conviction is tacos are insufficient without sauce. I don’t intend to offend my brother and sisters who are sauceless sinners. I do believe you ought to know that because it will affect how I exegete tacos. Tacos remind me of four theological truths. 

The Shell Defines the Taco: Jesus Defines the Church

What do you call the combination of meat, lettuce, and cheese? It could be a salad, a bunless burger or a lettuce wrap. Could we call it a taco? No. The distinctive aspect of a taco is the shell because it defines the taco. Shelless tacos don’t exist. 

Christ is our taco shell. He is the head of the church (Colossians 1:18). There is no church without Christ. An assembly without Christ as the head is an organization or institution, but it is far from a church. The culture has no authority to define what is a church. Numbers, ministries, and services don’t define a church, only Jesus.  Jesusless churches don’t exist. 

The Shell Holds the Ingredients Together: Jesus Hold Us Together

Tacos are filled with beef, shrimp, pork, fish, and countless other items. The ingredients inside the taco may vary, but all tacos are held together by a shell. The shell upholds the ingredients and prevents them from separating. 

Jesus holds all things together (Colossians 1:17). The Lord holds the universe in place with his righteous omnipotent hand. He also holds the church together. Christ is our cornerstone (1 Peter 2:6).  The body of Christ consists of people from various nations, tribes, and languages. Our differences could cause major divisions, but Christ holds us together. Sharing demographics doesn’t mean your church will stay together either. It takes Jesus to keep selfish sinners loving each other. Praise the Lord that his Church has not died out because he holds it together. Praise the Lord he can unite people from all across the world and hold them together. We worship in different buildings in different ways, but we share Jesus who holds us together.

Think Outside the Bun: Hold to the Fundamentals

For years Taco Bell has had the slogan “think outside the bun.” Taco Bell’s menu has changed many times over the years. They continue to introduce us to new tacos and burritos. Several of their menu items have been outlandish, but they haven’t had a bun. They have changed, but they hold fast to their fundamental beliefs.

Beloved, the culture has changed. Church attendance has decreased, but don’t shape your service for unbelievers to feel comfortable. We must update our evangelism strategies, but don’t try business tactics to win a soul. 

Church, remember the gospel.  Hold on to the fundamental truths of the gospel. The culture is changing.  It is tempting to change the fundamentals to get a bigger crowd, but the gospel is the only power unto salvation (Romans 1:16).  The ministries and the services may change but don’t let our gospel.

Don’t Forget the Sauce: Remember the Holy Spirit

Several years ago I took a trip to taco bell and forgot to get sauce. I ate my tacos but all I could think about was “I wish I had some sauce.” The sauce adds flavor to the taco. The sauce sinks into the open spaces within ingredients of the taco and fills them. Any taco that lacks sauce is incomplete.

I am aware each analogy of the trinity falls short and this one will also. Before you label me heretic hear me out. Christ is the shell and the Holy Spirit is the sauce. Christ upholds the church and the Spirit empowers the church. The Spirit sinks into every part of our lives. The church is led by the Spirit of God (Romans 8:14). The Holy Spirit fills the church (Ephesians 5:18). The Spirit gives us words to speak (John 16:13). He gives us the power to not live by the flesh (Galatians 5:16). The Spirit of God gives us flavor.  Believers, remember you have access to the Spirit of God. In conclusion, brothers and sister don’t forget the sauce.

Photo by Christine Siracusa on Unsplash

Charlottesville: What About the Next Rally?

What happened in Charlottesville, VA last weekend was depressing, but not unique. We have seen it in our history books when the Nazis chanted “blood and soil.” We have seen the videos of the KKK marching in the streets. The Mississippi Burning murders displayed to us that white supremacists are willing to kill. White supremacy has stained American history and politics. The violence in Charlottesville hits closer to home because the pictures are in living color, not black and white.

Laws and policies did not kill the ancient sin of racism. Racism has kept up with the times. It left the streets and hid in systems. Now it is back in the streets. It feels no need to hide anymore. The hidden white supremacy concerns me more than those people rallying in the streets. The racism under the white steeples is far more frightening than the racism under the white hoods.

Many white supremacists and neo-nazis were not in the streets last weekend but they were in the pews on Sunday. They profess to be saved by the blood of the Lamb but put their hope in their ancestor’s blood and land. Beware of the wolves hiding in God’s flock (Matthew 7:15).

Sin remains in this world so white supremacy is still alive. Time has not killed white nationalism. Men and women in their twenties and thirties were holding torches. We can’t eradicate sin, but we can fight. Jemar Tisby states:

Let’s also be clear that we can’t really end white supremacy. In the Christian view, racism is a sin, and sin cannot be completely eradicated on this side of eternity. But we are called to fight against sin in all its forms, so we should expect positive change in our churches and society at large as we fight against it.

Bruce Levell, the Executive Director of the National Diversity Coalition for Trump, stated we should ignore it. Levell believes if we don’t give events like this attention they will stop. Should we wait until white nationalist march again then post statuses about how sinful that event is?  Should we blame the left like Allen West? That has been our strategy for years. In the words of the infamous theologian Dr. Phil “How’s that working for you?”

Beloved, there will be another rally. How are you going to prepare?

Get Ready Church

To my minority brothers and sister speak the truth in love (Ephesians 4:15). Voice your concerns about our white superiority in the church. Pray for God to put the church on one accord. Engage in difficult conversations with your white brothers and sisters. Awkwardness in conversations means you are doing it right.

To my white brothers and sisters, be slow to speak and quick to listen (James 1:19). White supremacy is not limited to the racists marching in the streets. It is in our churches, denominations, and seminaries. Initiate those awkward racial conversations with your minority brothers and sisters. Let your speech be seasoned with salt (Colossians 4:6).

Speak about the sin of white supremacy offline.  It requires honest and hard face to face conversations. It requires Holy Spirit empowered work. Don’t wait for the next rally, confront racism now.

This is important for us right now because many of those advocating for white supremacy claim to do so in the name of Jesus Christ. Some of them speak of “Christendom” — by which they mean white European cultural domination — and not of Christianity. But many others are members of churches bearing the name of Jesus Christ. Nothing could be further from the gospel.

Dr. Russell Moore

 

 Photo by Jason Zeis

Rachel Dolezal and the Sin of Discontentment

Our eyes are never satisfied (Proverbs 27:20) with where we are or who we are. I once heard George Ross put it this way “We always want to be someone else, doing something else, somewhere else.” We envy the lives of others. Rarely, are we satisfied with who God has made us or where he has placed us. Introverts want to be extroverts. Lighter-skinned people want to be the tan ones. The left-brained people want to dominate by the right side of their brain. We are discontent.

The Discontentment of Ms. Dolezal

In 2015 Rachel Dolezal‘s parents revealed she was a white woman trying to “disguise herself” as a black female. She was the president of the NAACP’s chapter in Spokane, Washington. She disclaimed her white parents. She claimed her adopted brother was her son to carry on her facade. She frequents the tanning bed and hairdresser to maintain her appearance. She has admitted she was born white, but she chooses to identify as black. Dolezal identifies as black because of her discontentment.

Dolezal is an example of how far we will go when we are discontent. Have you ever put a significant amount of effort into conforming to the image of someone else?  What have you done to alter who God has made you? At times, we think our lives would be better if we were someone else, doing something else, somewhere else.

But God

God has made us in his image (Genesis 1:26). The Lord crafted us in our mother’s womb (Psalm 139:13). He gave us our eyes, smiles, and voices. He has gifted us with talents and abilities. He chose our ethnicity, personality, and family. God has had and still has control of every detail of our lives and he is using them for our good (Romans 8:28). Beloved, whatever hinders you from being content, God gave it to you. God has placed you where you are in life. You may be downcast about who you are, but the Master is still molding and making you (Romans 8:29). God has placed you at your wearisome job for a reason. Take courage that by God’s grace you are who you are. His grace has brought you where you are. When you are tempted to be discontent, remember the grace of God.

 

Side Rant:

I can’t leave this post without talking about Ms. Dolezal’s unique option or privilege. Canceling her appointments to the tanning bed and hairdresser could change her life. She could choose to identify as white. Black people don’t have that option. We are black twenty-four seven and that comes with some advantages and disadvantages. One of those disadvantages is pain and historical trauma. I would be curious to ask if Ms. Dolezal would like the whole black package.

Does she want to always wonder “Are they treating me this way because I am black?” What about the feelings of powerlessness? Or the feelings we have when people ignore our history? What about the televised misrepresentations? Does she want to look at injustice and say that could be me or my family? It is costly being someone else.

Whoever we idolize they have particular issues and sins that they have to deal with. Their social media accounts only capture a snapshot of what their lives are like. Instagram may capture their laughs but not their loneliness. Facebook post may reveal their wisdom, but not their weariness. Their emojis don’t show you their hearts. When you find yourself wanting to take a trip to someone else’s life remember that means you have to carry their baggage and yours.